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Employment weekly highlights—20 December 2018

Employment weekly highlights—20 December 2018
Published on: 20 December 2018
Published by: LexisPSL
  • Employment weekly highlights—20 December 2018
  • In this issue:
  • Status and worker categories
  • Government’s Good Work Plan to take forward Taylor Review recommendations
  • Uber drivers are workers confirms the Court of Appeal in majority decision
  • The Court of Justice rules on the role of a commercial agent
  • GP practice not vicariously liable for doctor’s negligence
  • Pay
  • Consultation launches on changes to the national minimum wage rules
  • Government publishes guidance on new payslip legislation
  • More...

Article summary

This week’s edition of Employment highlights includes: (1) the government’s Good Work Plan to take forward recommendations made in the Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices, (2) the Court of Appeal’s decision, by majority, that Uber drivers are workers, (3) a consultation on the national minimum wage (NMW) rules regarding salaried workers and the operation of salary sacrifice schemes, (4) government guidance on new legislation relating to payslips that comes into force in April 2019, (5) a Court of Appeal decision on the approach to be taken to determine the territorial test in respect of claims for a protective award for a failure to carry out statutory consultation in respect of collective redundancies, (6) an announcement by the government about the twelve steps it intends to take to tackle sexual harassment in the workplace, (7) analysis by Keith Bryant QC of Outer Temple Chambers of a Supreme Court case on the meaning of ‘unfavourable treatment’ for the purposes of a disability discrimination claim relating to calculation of a pension received following ill-health retirement, (8) an EAT case on the extent to which an Employment Judge may read words into legislation to make it compatible with rights under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), (9) employment tribunal quarterly statistics for the period July to September 2018, (10) a Home Office White Paper setting out the government’s plans to end free movement and to introduce a future skills-based immigration system when the UK leaves the EU, (11) guidance from the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) on data protection in the UK in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario (12) updates to our case, legislation and consultation trackers, (13) the latest Q&As, and (14) the Industrial Relations Law Reports (IRLR) Highlights for January 2019. or take a trial to read the full analysis.

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