Price and service transparency—law firms
Price and service transparency—law firms

The following Practice Compliance practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Price and service transparency—law firms
  • Price and service transparency—categories of work
  • Services in relation to individuals
  • Services in relation to businesses
  • Exceptions and omissions
  • Price and service transparency—information requirements
  • Costs information
  • How should the information be provided?
  • SRA templates
  • Pro bono work and free initial interviews
  • More...

From 6 December 2018, law firms must publish information on their website on the prices they charge and what these cover. This does not apply to all legal services, but only to:

  1. five categories of services offered to members of the public—residential conveyancing, uncontested UK probate and estate administration, immigration applications and appeals (excluding asylum), minor motoring offences and employment tribunals (employee claims for unfair or wrongful dismissal)

  2. three categories of services offered to business—debt recovery (up to £100,000), employment tribunals (defending claims for unfair or wrongful dismissal) and licensing applications for business premises

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) Transparency Rules aim to ensure people have accurate and relevant information about a firm when considering buying legal services, including understanding what the costs may be. The SRA believes the rules will help members of the public and small businesses make informed choices, improving competition in the legal market.

Being clear about the price and service will help avoid misunderstandings and cost-related complaints later in the matter. One quarter of all complaints dealt with by the Legal Ombudsman relate to costs.

The Transparency Rules are minimum standards. The SRA encourages you to provide additional information where you consider that it would aid your clients, potential clients or the public in understanding the services on offer.

The Transparency Rules are not aimed at requiring firms to adopt certain pricing models—they

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