Striking off and dissolution of a limited liability partnership
Striking off and dissolution of a limited liability partnership

The following Corporate practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Striking off and dissolution of a limited liability partnership
  • Application of CA 2006 to LLPs
  • Voluntary striking off and dissolution
  • Why apply for striking off and dissolution?
  • When is voluntary striking off suitable?
  • Preparing for striking off
  • When is a striking off application permitted?
  • The application
  • Copy of application to be given to certain persons
  • What happens next?
  • More...

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Following the COVID-19 outbreak, some Companies House filing and other administrative procedures have been temporarily suspended or changed. For further details of the impact of COVID-19, see Practice Note: Coronavirus (COVID–19)—impact on company filing and administrative procedures.

Striking off a limited liability partnership (as defined) (LLP) pursuant to Part 31 of the Companies Act 2006 (CA 2006) as modified by the Limited Liability Partnerships (Application of Companies Act 2006) Regulations 2009 (Regulations) is an administrative procedure that may be initiated either:

  1. voluntarily by the LLP's members, or

  2. by the Registrar of Companies in circumstances where it appears that the LLP is no longer in business or operation

Application of CA 2006 to LLPs

An LLP is a corporate body formed under the Limited Liability Partnerships Act 2000 (LLPA). The majority of law applicable to LLPs is actually modified company law rather than partnership law (see Practice Note: The nature of a limited liability partnership and its legal framework). The Regulations specify the provisions of the CA 2006 that apply to LLPs with appropriate modifications, including provisions relating to striking off and dissolving an LLP.

Voluntary striking off and dissolution

Why apply for striking off and dissolution?

Any LLP can apply to the Registrar of Companies to be struck off the register and dissolved. Some of the most common reasons why an LLP may wish to be struck off and

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