FIDIC contracts—introduction to the Red Book 1999
Produced in partnership with Victoria Tyson of Corbett & Co
FIDIC contracts—introduction to the Red Book 1999

The following Construction practice note produced in partnership with Victoria Tyson of Corbett & Co provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • FIDIC contracts—introduction to the Red Book 1999
  • What type of project is the contract suitable for?
  • The structure of the contract
  • Key features of the general conditions
  • Measurement and evaluation
  • Variations and adjustment
  • Payment and price
  • Termination
  • Claims for time and money
  • Dispute resolution
  • More...

FIDIC contracts—introduction to the Red Book 1999

This Practice Note looks at the FIDIC Conditions of Contract for Construction 1999, commonly known as the FIDIC Red Book 1999.

FIDIC published a new edition of the Red Book in December 2017—see Practice Note: FIDIC contracts—introduction to the FIDIC Red Book 2017 for guidance on the 2017 edition.

In relation to the 1999 suite, see also Practice Notes: FIDIC contracts—introduction to the Yellow Book 1999 and FIDIC contracts—introduction to the Silver Book 1999.

What type of project is the contract suitable for?

The FIDIC Red Book is recommended for building and engineering works where most (or all) of the works are to be designed by (or on behalf of) the Employer. The Red Book is not suitable for use where the Contractor is carrying out the design—in this case, the FIDIC Yellow or Silver Book should be used instead.

Like all the contracts in the FIDIC suite, the FIDIC Red Book is designed to be able to be used on international projects.

The four key areas to consider when choosing which specific form of FIDIC contract to use are—who undertakes the design, who supervises the Works, how the Contractor is to be paid and how the risk is to be shared.

The FIDIC Contracts Guide (1st edition, 2000) summarises each of these key areas as they are dealt with in the FIDIC Red Book

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