Secure tenancies
Secure tenancies

The following Local Government practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Secure tenancies
  • Secure tenancy
  • A dwelling
  • Let as a separate dwelling
  • Tenant condition
  • Principal home
  • Temporary absence
  • Landlord condition
  • Excluded categories
  • Possession
  • More...

Secure tenancies

Secure tenancy

Secure tenancies are the most common form of tenancies provided by local authorities. A secure tenancy exists when:

  1. the property is a dwelling house (See: A dwelling)

  2. it is let as a separate dwelling (See: Let as a separate dwelling)

  3. the landlord condition is satisfied (See: Landlord condition)

  4. the tenant condition is satisfied (See: Tenant condition)

  5. none of the exceptions apply

See further Precedents:

  1. Tenancy agreement creating a secure tenancy of a flat by a local authority registered provider, private registered provider or registered social landlord: Encyclopaedia of Forms and Precedents

  2. Tenancy agreement creating a secure tenancy of a house or flat on an estate by a private registered provider or registered social landlord: Encyclopaedia of Forms and Precedents

  3. Notice by landlord of variation of terms of a periodic secure tenancy under the Housing Act 1985 Section 103: Encyclopaedia of Forms and Precedents

  4. Preliminary notice by landlord of variation of terms of a periodic secure tenancy under the Housing Act 1985 Section 103: Encyclopaedia of Forms and Precedents

A dwelling

To qualify as ‘the property’, the house must be let for residential purposes and let as a separate dwelling.

To qualify as a dwelling, the accommodation must:

  1. be a person’s home, and

  2. must include facilities for living and sleeping (cooking facilities are not necessary)

The dwelling house can be the whole or part of a house,

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