IDNOs and Competition in Connections
IDNOs and Competition in Connections

The following Energy practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • IDNOs and Competition in Connections
  • What is an Independent Distribution Network Operator (IDNO)?
  • Key differences between DNOs and IDNOs
  • Competition for ownership and operation of new networks—IDNOs
  • Competition to design and build new networks—ICPs
  • Contracting with ICPs

IDNOs and Competition in Connections

What is an Independent Distribution Network Operator (IDNO)?

Electricity is conveyed from the generator (where it is produced) to the consumer by means of transmission and distribution networks. These are often collectively referred to as ‘the grid’ (although ‘the grid’ was traditionally a shorthand for just the transmission system, and is therefore sometimes still used in that way). For more information on:

  1. generators, see Practice Notes: Licensing of GB electricity generation and storage and Great Britain electricity generation, distribution and supply licensing and exemptions regime

  2. transmission networks, see Practice Notes: Licensing of GB Electricity Transmission, The role of National Grid in the Great Britain energy market and The Split of National Grid’s Transmission Owner (TO) and System Operator (SO) Roles and Licences

  3. distribution networks, see Practice Notes: Licensing of GB electricity distribution and Great Britain electricity generation, distribution and supply licensing and exemptions regime

A generator may be connected to the high-voltage ‘National Electricity Transmission System’ (NETS) or directly to a (mainly) low-voltage ‘distribution system’. But in either case it will generally, with exceptions, be a distribution system that finally conveys the electricity to the consumer’s premises.

Historically, the activities of electricity distribution and electricity supply (the latter being to sell the electricity to end-customers) were vertically integrated and carried out by the same entity, known as a ‘public electricity supplier’ (PES).

It would

Popular documents