Legal News

A policy of indefinite retention of convicts’ biometric data found to be unlawful (Gaughran v United Kingdom)

Published on: 19 February 2020
Published by: LexisPSL
  • A policy of indefinite retention of convicts’ biometric data found to be unlawful (Gaughran v United Kingdom)
  • What are the practical implications of this case?
  • What was the background?
  • What did the court decide?
  • Case details

Article summary

Public Law analysis: The Police Service of Northern Ireland had a policy of taking photographs, fingerprints and a DNA sample and profile (biometric data) from all persons arrested for a recordable offence and retaining that data indefinitely for those convicted (the policy). The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), applying principles established in its decision in Marper v UK, held that the policy amounted to a disproportionate interference with Mr Gaughran’s right to respect for his private and family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). It held that the indiscriminate nature of the powers of retention without reference to the seriousness of the offence or the need for indefinite retention and in the absence of any real possibility of review, failed to strike a fair balance between the competing public and private interests. Written by Jonathan Lewis, barrister, at Henderson Chambers. or take a trial to read the full analysis.

Popular documents