Display energy certificates (DECs)—what are they and when are they required?
Display energy certificates (DECs)—what are they and when are they required?

The following Environment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Display energy certificates (DECs)—what are they and when are they required?
  • Brexit impact
  • What is a display energy certificate (DEC)?
  • Key regulations
  • When is a DEC required?
  • Displaying a DEC
  • Excluded buildings
  • Enforcement
  • Developments

Brexit impact

11 pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marks the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period entered into following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s legal regime. Any changes relevant to this content will be set out below. For further guidance, see Practice Note: Brexit—impact on environmental law and News Analysis: Brexit Bulletin—key updates, research tips and resources.

What is a display energy certificate (DEC)?

DECs were introduced to raise public awareness of energy use and to inform visitors to public buildings about the energy use of a building. A DEC is an energy certificate that shows the operational energy rating of a public building, from A to G where A is very efficient and G is the least efficient. The operational rating is a numerical indicator of the actual annual carbon dioxide emissions from the building. DECs are based on the actual amount of metered energy used by the building over the last 12 months within the validity period of the DEC. The operational rating is calculated according to a methodology approved by the Secretary of State and carried out by an approved energy assessor using a specific software tool.

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