Acceptable behaviour contracts and local authorities
Produced in partnership with Morayo Fagborun Bennett of Hardwicke Chambers
Acceptable behaviour contracts and local authorities

The following Local Government practice note produced in partnership with Morayo Fagborun Bennett of Hardwicke Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Acceptable behaviour contracts and local authorities
  • Anti-social behaviour (ASB)
  • Reform of anti-social behaviour powers (2014)
  • Community remedy document
  • Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABCs)
  • Uses of an ABC
  • Is an ABC suitable for the situation?
  • Which perpetrator is an ABC suitable for?
  • Preparing for the ABC meeting
  • ABC meeting
  • More...

Acceptable behaviour contracts and local authorities

Coronavirus (COVID-19): During the current pandemic, legislation and changes to practice and procedure in the courts and tribunals have been introduced, which affect the following:

  1. proceedings for possession

  2. forfeiture of business leases on the grounds of non-payment of rent

  3. a landlord's right to exercise Commercial Rent Arrears Recovery (CRAR) and enforcement agents taking control of goods

  4. service of various notices to recover possession of residential properties

  5. practice and procedure in the First-tier Tribunal (Property Chamber) and Upper Tribunal (Lands Chamber)

  6. insolvency legislation of both a permanent and temporary nature

For further information and guidance, see: Coronavirus (COVID-19)—implications for property and Coronavirus (COVID-19)—social housing tracker.

Anti-social behaviour (ASB)

ASB is a broad term used to describe day-to-day incidents of crime, nuisance and disorder. ASB includes behaviour such as littering, vandalism, noise nuisance, aggressive dogs and abusive neighbours.

Local authorities may be required to deal with ASB in both a housing and a non-housing context. In a housing context, a landlord may be required to deal with ASB between neighbours and members of their households or involving uninvited visitors to estates. In a non-housing context, ASB may include street drinking, gangs of youths and prostitution.

Reform of anti-social behaviour powers (2014)

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (ABCPA 2014) received Royal Assent on 13 March 2014. It has reformed the tools available for dealing with ASB. The aim was

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