Tax considerations on a loan agreement—the tax gross up clause
Produced in partnership with Eloise Walker of Pinsent Masons
Tax considerations on a loan agreement—the tax gross up clause

The following Tax practice note Produced in partnership with Eloise Walker of Pinsent Masons provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Tax considerations on a loan agreement—the tax gross up clause
  • Definitions
  • UK PE
  • Obligor
  • Tax deduction
  • Qualifying lender
  • Treaty lender
  • DTTP scheme
  • Why have a tax gross up?
  • Tax gross up—a borrower problem
  • More...

IP COMPLETION DAY: 11pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marks the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period entered into following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s legal regime. This document contains guidance on subjects impacted by these changes. Before continuing your research, see Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for Tax?

It is standard market practice for loan agreements (also known as facility agreements), whether bilateral or syndicated, to:

  1. prohibit a borrower from deducting (or withholding) an amount from any payment unless that deduction is required to be withheld by law, and

  2. where tax is obliged by law to be withheld from a payment (such as withholding tax on interest), require (subject to limited exceptions) a borrower to pay an additional amount that, after deduction of the tax, will leave the lender with the same amount as it would have been entitled to receive had no tax been required to be withheld from the payment—this is known as the tax gross up

The prohibition on withholding is general and applies to any form of withholding. It would, for instance, prevent the borrower from deducting an amount owed by the lender to the borrower.

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