Gas to grid (biomethane) projects
Produced in partnership with Alex Clayton of Addleshaw Goddard and Ellen Beardsworth of Addleshaw Goddard
Gas to grid (biomethane) projects

The following Energy practice note produced in partnership with Alex Clayton of Addleshaw Goddard and Ellen Beardsworth of Addleshaw Goddard provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Gas to grid (biomethane) projects
  • Biogas—method of production and common uses
  • Introduction—biogas and biomethane
  • Biogas use—heat
  • Biogas use—electricity
  • Biogas use—Combined Heat and Power (CHP)
  • Gas to grid project
  • Funding and incentives
  • Regulation:
  • Overview
  • More...

Biogas—method of production and common uses

Introduction—biogas and biomethane

Through Anaerobic Digestion (AD) or the gasification and pyrolysis of organic matter, biogas can be produced. Biogas is a mixture of methane (approx 60%), carbon dioxide (approx 40%) and traces of other contaminant gases.

The biogas produced can then be combusted to provide heat, electricity, or both. Alternatively, the biogas can be purified and have propane added to become biomethane which is suitable for injection into the mains gas grid network in the UK (so called ‘gas to grid’). Although the focus of this note is gas to grid, for context we also provide a brief overview of the other ways in which biogas is typically used to generate energy (below).

(AD—AD is the creation of digestate and biogas (mainly methane), through the breakdown of an organic feedstock in the absence of oxygen by microorganisms. This process occurs in an insulated sealed container, heated between 35°C and 55°C. For further detail on what AD is, see Practice Note: Anaerobic digestion—technology.)

(Gasification and pyrolysis—gasification and pyrolysis are thermal processes that use high temperatures to break down the relevant feedstock. The main difference from traditional mass-burn incineration is that these technologies use less oxygen than the latter. The feedstock is broken down to create gas, solid and liquid residues. The pyrolysis process thermally degrades waste in the absence of oxygen. The gasification

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