The Fee-Paid Judicial Pension Scheme (FPJPS)
The Fee-Paid Judicial Pension Scheme (FPJPS)

The following Pensions guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The Fee-Paid Judicial Pension Scheme (FPJPS)
  • Statutory framework
  • Why was the FPJPS introduced?
  • Unregistered tax status
  • Governance
  • Eligibility
  • What about periods of service before 7 April 2000?
  • What about past fee-paid service in overlapping or concurrent appointments?
  • Contributions
  • Benefit structure
  • more

FORTHCOMING DEVELOPMENT: Further to the judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union in O Brien v Ministry of Justice on 7 November 2018 to the effect that the scheme membership entitlement of fee-paid judges extends to pre-7 April 2000 service, the Ministry of Justice intends to launch a consultation in spring 2020 on the changes required to reflect this judgment in the rules of the FPJPS. See: MoJ statement in fee-paid judicial litigation (December 2019).

Statutory framework

The Judicial Pension Scheme includes a number of judicial pension schemes.

Historically, there were:

  1. the Judicial Pension Scheme 1981 (JPS 1981). Salaried judges appointed before 31 March 1995 usually belong to this unfunded final salary scheme, which was established under the Judicial Pensions Act 1981

  2. the Judicial Pension Scheme 1993 (JPS 1993, alternatively known as JUPRA). Salaried judges appointed between 31 March 1995 and 31 March 2015 usually belong to this unfunded final salary scheme, which was established under the Judicial Pensions and Retirement Act 1993 (JPRA 1993). Note that there is a right of election to transfer from the JPS 1981 to the JPS 1993 at any time up to a date six months after retirement. For more information, see Practice Note: The Judicial Pension Scheme