Commentary

21.4 Form of conditions precedent and subsequent

BOILERPLATE AND COMMERCIAL CLAUSES vol 4(3)
| Commentary

21.4 Form of conditions precedent and subsequent

| Commentary

21.4 Form of conditions precedent and subsequent

It is not necessary to use any particular form of words to create or use conditions precedent and subsequent, nor is any special interpretation given to these phrases--they are interpreted like any other contractual provision. ‘Condition precedent’ and ‘condition subsequent’ are simply convenient labels for any contractual provision of these general types1. It is possible for other words to amount a condition precedent such as ‘if’, ‘provided always that’, ‘provided that’2. If there is no express wording indicating that a provision is a condition precedent, then in order for the clause to be

To continue reading
View the latest version of this document, as well as thousands of others like it, sign in to LexisLibrary or register for a free trial