Emily Taylor

Emily Taylor is an Associate Fellow of Chatham House and is Editor of the Journal of Cyber Policy. She is CEO of Oxford Information Labs. Emily’s research publications include The Internet in the Gulf (Chatham House); “ICANN: Bridging the Trust Gap” and “Privatisation of Human Rights” for the Global Commission; annual World Report on Internationalised Domain Names (lead author); studies for ICANN on the Domain Name Marketplace in Latin America and the Caribbean and the Middle East; and reports for the UK regulator, Ofcom, and a review of ICANN's policy development process. She is a member of ICANN’s independent Security and Stability Review Team, and chaired the independent WHOIS Review Team for ICANN. Emily served on the Internet Governance Forum’s Multistakeholder Advisory Group, and as part of the Global Commission on Internet Governance Research Network. From 2000-2009, she was at Nominet as Director of Legal and Policy. She has written for the Guardian, Ars Technica, and the New Statesman, and has appeared on the BBC Now Show.

Contributed to

9

Cybersquatting
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides an introduction to cybersquatting. Cybersquatting is the registration of a domain name that includes the trade mark of another business with the intention (or effect) of taking unfair advantage of that trade mark. It includes typo-squatting, the registration of a domain name that includes a misspelling of the trade mark of another business. There are various mechanisms for taking actions against cybersquatters including Nominet’s Dispute Resolution Service and the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP).

Domain name transfer (.com)
Practice notes

This Practice Note covers the transfer of domain names, specifically .com and other generic Top Level Domain names. It provides guidance on inter-register transfer and registrant transfer and provides examples of situations giving rise to a transfer such as resolution of a UDRP domain name dispute. This Practice Note includes tips for buyers and sellers of domain names and a step-by-step guide for achieving transfer.

Domain names—background, registration and dispute resolution
Practice notes

This Practice Note discusses the background to domain names, the process for registration and the practical and legal steps that can be taken to resolve disputes regarding domain names.

ICANN—New Generic Top Level Domain Program and brand protection
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides an introduction to Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), and looks at options for brand protection and the protection of domain and trade mark owners rights, including the operation of ICANN’s Uniform Rapid Suspension system, the Trademark Clearinghouse, and Post-Delegation Dispute Resolution Procedure.

Nominet dispute resolution service (DRS)
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides an explanation of Nominet’s dispute resolution service (DRS), which applies to all .uk domain names, including an overview of the process.

Preparing a UDRP complaint—before you start
Practice notes

This Practice Note covers the considerations to be taken into account before drafting a UDRP complaint in a potential domain name dispute. It sets out some preliminary considerations such as the suitability of UDRP, what might influence a Complainant’s chances of success, research into the Registrant, and how to approach negotiations to purchase a domain name. A checklist is provided of things to consider before filing a UDRP complaint.

Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP) process
Practice notes

This Practice Note describes the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP) process, governing the resolution of disputes between a domain name Registrant and a third party concerning an abusive or bad faith registration of a generic Top Level Domain (gTLD) name (such as .com, .net, .org, and .info) or of a country code Top Level Domain (ccTLD) that has adopted the UDRP on a voluntary basis.

Letter of claim—abusive domain name registration (UDRP)
Precedents

In a domain name dispute, this warning or ‘cease and desist’ letter is a first step to take before filing a formal complaint against an abusive domain name registration under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy process (UDRP), which applies to all generic Top Level Domains such as .com, .biz and .org. This cease and desist letter can be adapted for the purpose of Nominet’s equivalent Dispute Resolution System (DRS), which applies to co.uk and .uk domain names.

UDRP complaint
Precedents

This Precedent Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP) complaint is suitable for complaints concerning abusive domain name registrations that are governed by the UDRP process and filed with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Arbitration and Mediation Center.

Practice areas

Panel

  • Contributing Author

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