David Salter

Solicitor, deputy High Court judge and Recorder
David Salter has enjoyed a varied career in family law with over 45 years’ experience. He served as National Head of Family Law at Addleshaw Goddard and, subsequently, as Joint National Head of Family Law at Mills & Reeve, retiring in 2018. 

From 1997-1999, David was Chairman of Resolution, also acting as the first Chairman of Resolution’s Accreditation Committee. He subsequently became President of the International Academy of Family Lawyers from 2010 to 2012, having previously served as the Academy's European Chapter President. 

He has sat in various part-time judicial posts since 1985 and now sits regularly as a deputy High Court judge and Recorder in the Family Court. He also conducts private financial dispute resolution appointments. 

David was one of the original members of the Family Procedure Rules Committee which framed the 2010 Rules, serving a ten-year term from 2004 to 2014. 

He is a prolific author on a variety of family topics with an acknowledged expertise in relation to pensions on divorce. He is a contributor to the Family Court Practice (The Red Book), Butterworths Family Law Service, Rayden and Jackson, the International Family Law Practice and LexisPSL Family. 
Contributed to

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Applications to restrain future dealing—MCA 1973, s 37
Practice notes

This Practice Note details the jurisdiction and procedure regarding applications under section 37 of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 (MCA 1973) to restrain future dealings of financial assets in family proceedings where the applicant believes that a party may take steps to frustrate their financial claim.

Costs in family proceedings
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides guidance on the rules regarding costs in family proceedings, the application of the Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010) and the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR 1998), and factors taken into account by the court in determining costs including conduct and offers of settlement. It also considers costs on divorce or dissolution, the types of costs orders that may be made by the court, costs in relation to litigants in person and costs orders against non-parties.

Costs in financial proceedings
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides a summary of the rules in relation to costs in proceedings for a financial remedy within divorce or civil partnership proceedings that are subject to the Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010) or in financial proceedings that are subject to the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR 1998).

Declarations of presumed death
Practice notes

This Practice Note deals with the circumstances in which an application may be made under the Presumption of Death Act 2013 that a missing person has died, or has not been known to be alive for a period of at least seven years. Such a declaration is effective against all persons and for all purposes, including for the purposes of the acquisition of an interest in any property, and the ending of a marriage or civil partnership to which the missing person is a party. The provisions of the Guardianship (Missing Persons) Act 2017 are also considered.

Disclosure or inspection orders in relation to non-parties
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out the procedure and approach to obtaining a disclosure or inspection order regarding a non-party to family proceedings under the provisions of the Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010), including case law examples. It also details other procedures whereby a disclosure order may be made, and the implications of a claim of public interest immunity.

Freezing orders (Mareva)—family proceedings
Practice notes

This Practice Note details the provisions in relation to an application for a freezing order to restrain dealings with assets which are the subject of a financial claim in family proceedings including requirements, procedure and relevant case law.

Implications of legal aid
Practice notes

This Practice Note explains the implications of a costs order being made against a legally aided party. It covers limitations on such a costs order, when a legally aided party’s costs protection will come to an end, and the limited range of legal aid to which costs protection applies. It also details when a costs order may be made against the Lord Chancellor.

Security for costs in family proceedings
Practice notes

This Practice Note explains the provisions for security for costs in the Family Procedure Rules 2010 (FPR 2010). It covers the procedure and the courts’ powers to make an order for security for costs and the conditions that have to be met. It considers the amount of security and the situation where a legally aided client is required to give security for costs.

Wasted costs
Practice notes

This Practice Note explains wasted costs orders in family proceedings including the relevant test applied by the courts and the required procedural steps. It also considers improper, unreasonable or negligent conduct and the effect misconduct can have on costs.

Practice areas

Membership

  • President and Fellow of the International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, Resolution

Panel

  • Contributing Author
  • Other Publications

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