Corporation Tax

Introduction to stamp taxes

Produced by Tolley in association with Grant Thornton's stamp taxes team
  • 22 Dec 2021 16:11

The following Corporation Tax guidance note Produced by Tolley in association with Grant Thornton's stamp taxes team provides comprehensive and up to date tax information covering:

  • Introduction to stamp taxes
  • SDLT
  • Stamp duty
  • Stamp duty reserve tax (SDRT)

Introduction to stamp taxes

There are a number of UK stamp taxes which apply to transactions involving real estate and stocks and marketable securities, which include:

  1. stamp duty land tax (SDLT), applying broadly to transactions in land interests situated in England and Northern Ireland (separate regimes apply to transactions that take place in Wales and Scotland, see below)

  2. stamp duty, broadly charged on instruments (for example, a stock transfer form) that transfer UK shares and certain other securities

  3. stamp duty reserve tax (SDRT), broadly applying to electronic (or paperless) transfers of UK shares and certain other securities

Each tax is briefly described below, with links to separate guidance notes containing further details.

SDLT

SDLT was introduced from 1 December 2003 to replace stamp duty on transactions involving interests in land and buildings. Its scope is much wider than stamp duty in that it may apply to any acquisition of a chargeable interest, and is a self-assessed tax on the transaction, in many cases requiring the submission of an SDLT return to HMRC.

When it was originally introduced, SDLT applied to all UK land transactions. However, devolution has resulted in Scotland and Wales introducing their own regimes.

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