Leslie Heasman#7282

Leslie Heasman

Consultant Environmental Chemist, MJCA
Leslie is an environmental chemist who has worked in waste management for more than 30 years. After graduating with a B.Sc. in Environmental Chemistry from the University of Edinburgh she started work undertaking research at AERE Harwell into the fundamental behaviour of wastes and the outputs of the research fed into key government guidance documents. Since 1986 she has been providing technical advice on environmental issues with MJCA where she now is the Managing Director and Principal Environmental Chemist. 
 
Leslie has particular interest and expertise in the assessment and control of chemical contaminants in the aquatic, atmospheric and soil environments. She has wide experience in waste management, mineral extraction, contaminated land and general environmental management together with particular skills in risk assessment where understanding the fate and transport of contaminants in the environment is critical. 
 
The technical aspects of managing waste routinely need to be considered alongside the regulatory controls over the management of waste – from something as basic (but for from simplistic) as the definition of waste to matters as complex as what technology is regarded as ‘best’ for the management of a specific waste type at a particular point in time. Leslie has unusual and extensive experience in the practical application of these areas of interaction.
 
Leslie is a Chartered Chemist and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, she is a Member of the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management, a Chartered Resource and Waste Manager and a Chartered Environmentalist.
Contributed to

10

Meaning of waste—definition of waste
Meaning of waste—definition of waste
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides guidance on the definition of waste. In particular it focuses on how interpretation will affect the definition of waste, including what key terms are relevant, how to interpret ‘discard’, looking at deliberate and accidental discard, as well as the intention to discard. The Practice Note also provides information on when there may be a requirement to discard and the effect of transfer to another person. There is also reference to the definition of waste service.

Meaning of waste—disposal operations
Meaning of waste—disposal operations
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides guidance on the meaning of waste and disposal operations. It provides details on how disposal is one of the key waste management elements of the Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC (WFD) and implementing regulations. This Practice Note also covers the list of non-exhaustive disposal operations covered in the WFD and covers key principles and case law.

Meaning of waste—end-of-waste status
Meaning of waste—end-of-waste status
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides practical guidance on the end-of-waste status. It refers to the Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC (WFD) and implementing and retained regulations in England and Wales, setting out end-of-waste criteria, principles and conditions, including specific criteria for certain waste types. It also refers to quality protocols (QPs), self-assessments and end-of-waste submissions to the regulators. The Practice Note includes references to relevant case law and covers recovery operations and their effect on the end-of-waste status.

Meaning of waste—products and by-products
Meaning of waste—products and by-products
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides details on the meaning of waste, in particular products and by-products. It provides guidance on the differences between waste and by-products, focussing on production residues, products, by-products, certainty of use, extractive industries, with or without further processing, whether an action is integral to the production process, lawful use and the decision process.

Meaning of waste—recovery operations
Meaning of waste—recovery operations
Practice notes

This Practice Note covers the definition of recovery operations and the list of waste recovery operations under the revised Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC (WFD). It also covers EU and UK case law on the interpretation of ‘recovery operations’ and the meaning of ‘recycling’. It is part of a series of notes on the meaning of waste. This Practice Note also links to related Brexit content.

Meaning of waste—waste hierarchy
Meaning of waste—waste hierarchy
Practice notes

This Practice Note covers the waste hierarchy, related policies and legislation, and the circumstances that allow departure from the hierarchy. It is part of a series of notes on the meaning of waste. This Practice Note also links to related Brexit content.

Meaning of waste—waste indicators
Meaning of waste—waste indicators
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides guidance on waste indicators when assessing the meaning of waste. It focuses on positive waste indicators providing information on production residues, negative economic value, what is commonly regarded as waste, common methods of recovery or disposal, use of the material, perception of the holder, limits on the quantity produced and contamination. Other relevant factors are also considered such as economic value or re-utilisation, the list of wastes, characteristics of the substance or object, impact on the environment and place of storage.

Meaning of waste—what is waste?
Meaning of waste—what is waste?
Practice notes

This Practice Note outlines the meaning of waste by referring to the Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC as implemented by the Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011, SI 2011/988 and other relevant legislation. The Practice Note highlights key issues surrounding interpretation of case law and provides details on relevant guidance for defining waste. It also provides a series of helpful questions to work through when ascertaining if an item is waste.

Other work

Practice Area

Panel

  • Contributing Author

Membership

  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Chartered Chemist
  • Member of the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management. Chartered Resource and Waste Manager
  • Chartered Environmentalist

Qualification

  • BSc (Hons) Environmental Chemistry (1982)

Education

  • University of Edinburgh (1978 - 1982)

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