Richard A Buckley#623

Professor Richard A Buckley, M.A, D.Phil, DCL, Oxford

Barrister (Lincoln's Inn), Emeritus Professor of Law, University of Reading

Professor Buckley is an Emeritus Professor of Law 2008 -. Formerly Professor of Law, University of Reading 1993-2008; Fellow and Tutor in Law, Mansfield College, Oxford 1975-1993; Lecturer in Laws, King's College, London 1970-1975. Leverhulme Research Fellow, 2001. Publications include The Law of Negligence and Nuisance, 5th ed (2011, LexisNexis); Illegality and Public Policy, 2nd ed (2009, Sweet & Maxwell); The Law of Nuisance, 2nd ed (1995, Butterworths). Professor Buckley is also a contributing editor to Clerk and Lindsell on Torts, Halsbuy's Laws of England, Atkin's Court Forms, Fleming's The Law of Torts, 10th ed (2011), and formerly to Salmond and Heuston on Torts.

Contributed to

6

Breach of statutory duty
Breach of statutory duty
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers when it might be possible to bring a claim for damages for breach of a statutory duty, including the nature of the liability, the tests to apply in determining whether or not such liability arises, the standard of liability and defences thereto.

Negligence—key elements to establish a negligence claim
Negligence—key elements to establish a negligence claim
Practice notes

This Practice Note outlines the key elements for establishing a claim in negligence, ie the existence of a duty of care, breach of that duty, damage caused by the breach and the foreseeability of such damage.

Negligence—when does a duty of care arise?
Negligence—when does a duty of care arise?
Practice notes

This Practice Note on negligence considers the requirements for establishing a duty of care to found a negligence claim: issues of foreseeability, proximity, what is ‘fair, just and reasonable’; assumption of responsibility, as well as those factors preventing a duty of care arising and special consideration given to the emergency services and restriction of the scope of the duty in areas of economic loss and psychiatric damage; together with practical considerations when bringing such claims.

Negligence—when is the duty of care breached?
Negligence—when is the duty of care breached?
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers what conduct may amount to a negligent breach of the duty of care and considers the concepts of reasonableness, objectivity, the four factors considered in establishing a breach, whether common practice, hindsight and errors of judgment are relevant to determining whether there has been a negligent breach of the duty of care. It also covers the particular considerations as regards duties owed to children.

Negligent misstatement—defences and remedies
Negligent misstatement—defences and remedies
Practice notes

This Practice Note on negligent misstatement discusses how liability may be avoided through disclaimers of liability (including consideration of the effect of the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977), contributory negligence and public policy immunity issues. It also considers the basis on which a claim for negligent misstatement can be brought, either under the common law (Hedley Byrne) or under the Misrepresentation Act 1967, s 2(1).

Negligent misstatement—founding a claim
Negligent misstatement—founding a claim
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers the key elements for founding a claim for negligent misstatement, with particular reference to claims for financial loss and claims by third parties, including the decision in Playboy Club v Banco Nazionale.

Practice Area

Panel

  • Contributing Author

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