Ken McCracken#2979

Ken McCracken

Consultant
Ken is recognised as one of the leading family business consultants in Europe. His work focusses on helping family businesses and family offices create the type of governance that will help them to achieve their version of success. Ken is also actively involved in advocacy to improve the overall awareness of the economic and social contribution made by enterprising families. He a Fellow of the Family Firm Institute (FFI), the leading international organisation for family business professionals and academics and is the author and teacher of the Advanced Certificate in Family Business Advising for the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners (STEP). He is a past recipient of the FFI Award for Outstanding Interdisciplinary Achievement and the STEP Award for Family Business Adviser of the Year.
Contributed to

6

Employing family members in a family business
Employing family members in a family business
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers the advantages and risks involved in employing family members within a family business and the need to balance these advantages and risks. The Note then considers how the risks can be managed by putting in place an effective family employment policy.

Family businesses—family governance
Family businesses—family governance
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers governance of the family business, including natural or organic governance systems and formal governance structures and policies.

Family businesses—ownership governance
Family businesses—ownership governance
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers the types of owners in a family business and, in particular, the difference between ‘value-out’ owners and custodians. The differing attitudes of these different types of owner to selling shares and to selling the business is discussed, as are other issues such as whether spouses should be made shareholders or not and whether all shareholders should be required to work in the business. The Practice Note also considers the possibility of consolidating ownership in family branches and the setting up of a Shareholders’ Assembly or Shareholders’ Council as a forum for owners to agree policies governing ownership.

Family businesses—the family constitution
Family businesses—the family constitution
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides an overview of a family constitution, including a list of contents for a family constitution. Note that other names for a family constitution include a family charter, a family creed or a family protocol.

Passing on the family business
Passing on the family business
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers five distinct stages of succession planning: preparation, triggers, exploration, choice and implementation.

Selling the family business
Selling the family business
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers selling the family business and includes a possible agenda for a meeting with the current owners and the rest of the family who will be affected by whatever decision is reached. It also considers the technical issues that might arise on the sale of family business and the circumstances in which a family buyout may be considered.

Practice areas

Panel

  • Contributing Author

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