Eleanor Holland#2143

Eleanor Holland

A barrister at 4 Stone Buildings, Eleanor has been recommended by Legal 500 as one of the top ten commercial litigation juniors under eight years' call, and is described as 'Good with clients, hardworking and a very nice person too'. Eleanor has a broad commercial Chancery practice, including insolvency, commercial disputes, shareholder disputes, and banking and finance. She provides practical advice tailored to meeting the client's objectives, and is particularly sought after for work involving complex legal questions. Eleanor regularly receives repeat instructions from solicitors' firms, and she works both alone and led by barristers (including silks) in and out of Chambers. Eleanor regularly accepts instructions with a German language element. Eleanor is also a CEDR-accredited mediator, offering a practical and constructive approach to parties wishing to explore settlement of their dispute. Eleanor is committed to the Bar's pro bono efforts, including through the Bar Council Pro Bono Committee, the Chancery Bar Association committee and PILARS.
Contributed to

6

Company statutory demand—the position under The Insolvency (England and Wales) Rules 2016
Company statutory demand—the position under The Insolvency (England and Wales) Rules 2016
Practice notes

This Practice Note covers the position under the Insolvency (England and Wales) Rules 2016, SI 2016/1024 post–6 April 2017. This Practice Note, produced in partnership with Eleanor Holland and Karl Anderson of 4 Stone Buildings, considers statutory demands in the context of corporate debtors. It provides guidance on the drafting of a statutory demand, including the correct what information the statutory demand must contain, and sets out the requirements as to how to serve the statutory demand on the corporate debtor. Finally, it sets out what the consequences are to a corporate debtor if it fails to comply with a statutory demand served on it, principally that it will allow the creditor to present a winding-up petition against the corporate debtor.

Compulsory liquidation—issuing a petition
Compulsory liquidation—issuing a petition
Practice notes

This Practice Note, produced in partnership with Eleanor Holland and Karl Anderson of 4 Stone Buildings, sets out various circumstances when a company may be wound up by the court (ie compulsory liquidation), including resolution by the company itself, where the company has not commenced trading or suspends its business, on just and equitable grounds, or when a creditor asserts that the company is insolvent, usually because it is unable to pay its debts.

Compulsory winding up of a company—the process and procedure
Compulsory winding up of a company—the process and procedure
Practice notes

This Practice Note, produced in partnership with Eleanor Holland and Karl Anderson of 4 Stone Buildings, provides guidance as to the practice and procedure on the presentation of a winding-up petition by a creditor of a company. It considers the checks to be undertaken and information obtained prior to presenting a winding-up petition, and the steps to be taken by following issue, including the service and advertisement of the winding-up petition. Finally, this Practice Note looks at the steps the debtor company should take if it intends to oppose the winding-up petition, and what the petitioning creditor needs to do if it wishes to withdraw the winding-up petition.

Effect on proceedings against a company being wound up and after a winding-up order is made
Effect on proceedings against a company being wound up and after a winding-up order is made
Practice notes

This Practice Note, produced in partnership with Eleanor Holland and Karl Anderson of 4 Stone Buildings, looks at the effect on court proceedings where the defendant company either has a winding-up order made against it, or where its members pass a resolution for its winding up, or where a winding-up petition is presented against it.

Following the making of a compulsory winding up order by the court
Following the making of a compulsory winding up order by the court
Practice notes

This Practice Note, produced in partnership with Eleanor Holland and Karl Anderson of 4 Stone Buildings, sets out the consequences and effect of the making of a winding-up order by the court on a creditor’s winding-up petition, also known as a compulsory liquidation or winding-up, including the steps that the official receiver is required to take, what happens to the directors’ powers, and who the liquidator will be.

Validation orders—dispositions of property after commencement of winding up
Validation orders—dispositions of property after commencement of winding up
Practice notes

This Practice Note, produced in partnership with Eleanor Holland and Karl Anderson of 4 Stone Buildings, covers the situation when an application to court is to be made pursuant to section 127 of the Insolvency Act 1986 for a validation order in circumstances where any disposition of the company’s property after presentation against it of a winding-up petition would otherwise be void. It deals with requests to allow payments to be made by the company in the ordinary course of its business, as well as an order permitting the sale of a specific property. This can apply to both prospective—as well as retrospective—dispositions of the company’s property. The validation order is usually for a specific period and is also usually limited to a specific purpose, which will be set out in the validation order granted. This Practice Note details when to make an application, how to make that application, in what circumstances the court will typically make an order and urgent applications.

Practice Area

Panel

  • Contributing Author

Qualified Year

  • 2010

Membership

  • Lincoln's Inn
  • Chancery Bar Association
  • COMBAR

Education

  • Jesus College, Oxford: Jesus College Law Prize, Edwin Jones Scholarship and S.R. Welson Prize
  • Lincoln's Inn: Lord Denning Scholarship, Hardwicke Entrance Award, Buchanan Prize and Pupillage Sc
  • BA (Oxon)
  • LLM

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