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UK Parliament’s role in ratifying a UK-EU future relationship treaty

UK Parliament’s role in ratifying a UK-EU future relationship treaty
Published on: 13 November 2020
Published by: LexisPSL
  • UK Parliament’s role in ratifying a UK-EU future relationship treaty
  • The Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010
  • Treaties must be laid before Parliament
  • CRGA 2010, s 20: The default process of 21 sitting days
  • Can MPs and Peers block ratification?
  • Is there time for ratification?
  • CRGA 2010, s 22: ‘Exceptional’ cases and speeding up the process
  • Disapplying CRGA 2010 with implementing primary legislation
  • Could there still be debates and votes on the treaty?

Article summary

Public Law analysis: The UK’s post-Brexit transition period expires at 11pm on 31 December 2020. The UK and EU are in negotiations to agree a new treaty-based relationship before then, so that co-operation in key areas can continue in mutually beneficial ways. However, unless one or more treaties can be ratified before the end of 2020, many of the current arrangements automatically end. In this insight, Graeme Cowie, constitutional law researcher at the House of Commons Library, explains that, although the UK Parliament normally has a statutory period to scrutinise and potentially debate any new UK-EU treaty, it will not necessarily vote on whether to approve it. The UK government could also reduce or remove that scrutiny period if it wished. or take a trial to read the full analysis.

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