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Collective enfranchisement—when is a flat a ‘flat’? (Aldford House v Grosvenor)

Collective enfranchisement—when is a flat a ‘flat’? (Aldford House v Grosvenor)
Published on: 17 December 2018
Published by: LexisPSL
  • Collective enfranchisement—when is a flat a ‘flat’? (Aldford House v Grosvenor)
  • What are the practical implications of this case?
  • What was the background?
  • What is the law in this area?
  • What were the issues involved?
  • What did the court decide?
  • Why did the court decide that the flats were separate sets of premises?
  • Why did the court decide that the flats were constructed or adapted for use for the purposes of a dwelling?
  • Why was the Initial Notice invalid?
  • Why couldn’t the nominee purchaser rely on the Second Notice?
  • More...

Article summary

Property analysis: Flats which had been created out of one space by inserting a dividing wall, but which had not been fully fitted out were still ‘flats’ for the purposes of the collective enfranchisement regime. This meant an initial notice, which did not include details of the tenants of those flats, was invalid. or take a trial to read the full analysis.

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