Q&As

Why does the Statement of Costs for summary assessment Form N260, not include provision for incoming correspondence? Why are the true costs of preparing a Statement of Costs rarely recovered?

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Published on LexisPSL on 09/03/2018

The following Dispute Resolution Q&A provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Why does the Statement of Costs for summary assessment Form N260, not include provision for incoming correspondence? Why are the true costs of preparing a Statement of Costs rarely recovered?
  • Statement of Costs for summary assessment
  • Recovery of costs in the statement of costs

Why does the Statement of Costs for summary assessment Form N260, not include provision for incoming correspondence? Why are the true costs of preparing a Statement of Costs rarely recovered?

Statement of Costs for summary assessment

A party wishing to claim costs must prepare a written statement setting out their costs (CPR PD 44, para 9.5(2)). This is known as a 'statement of costs'. It is used by a party to set out all the costs it incurred in making the application or, if dealing with a fast track case, the entire claim. The statement of costs is provided to the court by completing Form N260 as you have identified.

Commentary: The Statement of Costs: Cook on Costs [27.17] explains:

‘The post-March 2013 form was introduced as a result of the almost universal criticism of the lack of information on the old form (endorsed by Sir Rupert Jackson) and the potential that this created 'broad brush' injustice. The new form now has an additional sheet that provides for a breakdown of the time claimed for documents so that the judge has a far clearer idea of what work the receiving party has done. However, do not expect the assessment to become a quasi-detailed assessment with the court going

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