Q&As

Where a landowner is required to enter into a lease for a substation on its land for the sole benefit of adjoining land, is there any requirement under electricity legislation for the network operator to be reasonable in negotiating the lease terms with my client? On what basis could my client seek redress to Ofgem if the network operator was not?

read titleRead full title
Produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk
Published on LexisPSL on 28/10/2016

The following Property Disputes Q&A produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Where a landowner is required to enter into a lease for a substation on its land for the sole benefit of adjoining land, is there any requirement under electricity legislation for the network operator to be reasonable in negotiating the lease terms with my client? On what basis could my client seek redress to Ofgem if the network operator was not?

Where a landowner is required to enter into a lease for a substation on its land for the sole benefit of adjoining land, is there any requirement under electricity legislation for the network operator to be reasonable in negotiating the lease terms with my client? On what basis could my client seek redress to Ofgem if the network operator was not?

Electricity companies, in common with other utility suppliers, are under statutory obligations to provide continuity of supply. This may mean that, for example, an electricity company requires the siting of a substation on land, but for the sole benefit of adjoining land.

In such circumstances, the electricity company will secure its equipment on private land either by way of a wayleave (a contractual right), a deed or a lease. Permission is required from the

Related documents:

Popular documents