Q&As

When using a 'no other use' clause, ie 'The Tenant shall not use the Property for any illegal purpose nor for any purpose or in a manner that would cause loss, damage, injury, nuisance or inconvenience to the Landlord, its other tenants or any other owner or occupier of neighbouring property', is it correct to assume that it is implied the Tenant will not be liable for the actual financial loss caused?

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Published on LexisPSL on 27/07/2015

The following Property Disputes Q&A provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • When using a 'no other use' clause, ie 'The Tenant shall not use the Property for any illegal purpose nor for any purpose or in a manner that would cause loss, damage, injury, nuisance or inconvenience to the Landlord, its other tenants or any other owner or occupier of neighbouring property', is it correct to assume that it is implied the Tenant will not be liable for the actual financial loss caused?

Leases of buildings, whether dwelling houses or trade premises, usually contain a covenant by the tenant restricting their use. Such covenants may be enforced by injunction, or breaches of them may be compensated by damages, or, if there is a right of re-entry, the landlord may seek to forfeit the lease. Breach of a covenant in a lease not to use the premises

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