Q&As

When issuing proceedings for unpaid fees against a former client domiciled in Florida can I serve at him: at the property in the jurisdiction, the work related to this property rather than in Florida which would require permission; by email, as we have always communicated by email?

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Produced in partnership with Jonathan Edwards of Radcliffe Chambers
Published on LexisPSL on 06/11/2017

The following Dispute Resolution Q&A produced in partnership with Jonathan Edwards of Radcliffe Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • When issuing proceedings for unpaid fees against a former client domiciled in Florida can I serve at him: at the property in the jurisdiction, the work related to this property rather than in Florida which would require permission; by email, as we have always communicated by email?
  • Presence in the jurisdiction and service
  • Service by email

When issuing proceedings for unpaid fees against a former client domiciled in Florida can I serve at him: at the property in the jurisdiction, the work related to this property rather than in Florida which would require permission; by email, as we have always communicated by email?

Presence in the jurisdiction and service

To effect service in the jurisdiction, it does not require that the defendant be domiciled in the jurisdiction. Nor is it necessary for the defendant to be physically within the jurisdiction. There are valid methods of service other than personal service and, unsurprisingly, service by delivery to a person’s residence is not invalidated if the person happens to be temporarily out of the jurisdiction at the time.

Part 6 of the Civil Procedure Rules 1998 (CPR 6) concerns the service of documents in proceedings. CPR 6.3, and the other rules to which it refers, set out permissible methods of service in the jurisdiction. These are subject to section IV of CPR 6, clarifying that (for

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