Website accessibility
Website accessibility

The following IP guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Website accessibility
  • The Equality Act 2010 and the duty to make reasonable adjustments
  • Practical steps for compliance
  • Additional requirements for the public sector

All websites should be accessible, especially by people with disabilities. Access to websites is governed by the Equality Act 2010 (EqA 2010) (which replaced the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA 1995)) and the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 (PSBAR), SI 2018/952, which implements provisions of Directive (EU) 2016/2102 concerning the accessibility of websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies.

When designing a website or mobile application, all types of disability should be considered, including blindness and visual impairment, hearing loss and cognitive or motor impairment. This Practice Note explores the legal obligations and how those obligations can be met in practice, covering:

  1. The Equality Act 2010 and the duty to make reasonable adjustments

  2. Practical steps for compliance

  3. Additional requirements for the public sector

The Equality Act 2010 and the duty to make reasonable adjustments

EqA 2010 does not specifically deal with website accessibility but it does cover the provision of services, which includes services provided by a website operator. In summary, website operators are under a duty to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people in the services they provide.

EqA 2010 provides a range of measures relating to discrimination. Section 20 relates to disability discrimination and imposes a duty to make reasonable adjustments in respect of disabled people. Section 20 sets out three basic requirements,