Voluntary energy labelling
Produced in partnership with Patrick Senior of Stephenson Harwood
Voluntary energy labelling

The following Environment guidance note Produced in partnership with Patrick Senior of Stephenson Harwood provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Voluntary energy labelling
  • Brexit impact
  • Role and standing of voluntary energy labels
  • Energy labels with a basis in EU law
  • Third party energy labelling organisations operating in the UK

Brexit impact

As of exit day (31 January 2020) the UK is no longer an EU Member State. However, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK has entered an implementation period, during which it continues to be subject to EU law. This has an impact on this content.

For further guidance, see Practice Note: Brexit—impact on environmental law and News Analysis: Brexit Bulletin—key updates, research tips and resources.

Role and standing of voluntary energy labels

A person (Operator) manufacturing, importing, distributing or selling goods and services (products) within the EU may choose to use voluntary energy labels to market those products. If the Operator chooses to use a voluntary energy label, it must comply with the rules governing its use.

Some voluntary energy labels have been established under EU law (the Energy Star and the Ecolabel), and therefore the rules that the Operator must comply with are set out in EU law. Other voluntary energy labels have been established by third party institutions (eg trusts), and the rules that Operators must comply with will be agreed between the Operator and the third party institution.

Energy labels with a basis in EU law

The energy labels below, the EU Energy Star and the EU Ecolabel, are established under EU regulations.

EU Energy Star

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