Vienna Convention on Early Notification of Nuclear Accidents 1986—snapshot
Produced in partnership with Clare Regnart
Vienna Convention on Early Notification of Nuclear Accidents 1986—snapshot

The following Environment guidance note Produced in partnership with Clare Regnart provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Vienna Convention on Early Notification of Nuclear Accidents 1986—snapshot
  • Snapshot on 1986 Vienna Convention on Early Notification of Nuclear Accidents
  • Overview
  • Purpose of the Convention
  • What does the Convention do?
  • Key provisions
  • International nuclear and radiological event scale
  • Implementation in Europe
  • Implementation in the UK
  • Related international laws

Snapshot on 1986 Vienna Convention on Early Notification of Nuclear Accidents

Title Vienna Convention on Early Notification of Nuclear Accidents
Parties 114 Parties
Location Vienna
Adopted 26th September 1986
Came into force 27th October 1986
Subject Requirement for prompt notification of nuclear accident

Overview

The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident establishes a notification system for nuclear accidents which have the potential for international transboundary release that could be of radiological safety significance for another State.

The failure of the USSR to provide information immediately following the Chernobyl accident led to the Convention.

The Convention requires States to report the accident's time, location, radiation releases, and other data essential for assessing the situation. Notification is to be made to affected States directly or through the International Atomic Energy agency (IAEA), and to the IAEA itself. Reporting is mandatory for any nuclear accident involving facilities and activities listed in Article 1. Pursuant to Article 3, States may notify other accidents as well.

China, France,