Vienna Convention 1985 (protection of the ozone Layer)—snapshot

The following Environment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Vienna Convention 1985 (protection of the ozone Layer)—snapshot
  • Background to the Convention
  • Key provisions
  • Domestic and European implementation

Vienna Convention 1985 (protection of the ozone Layer)—snapshot

TitleVienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer
Parties197 Parties
RevisionsMontreal Protocol 1987
London Amendment 1990
Copenhagen Amendment 1992
Montreal Amendment 1997
Beijing Amendment 1999
LocationVienna
Adopted1985
Came into force22 September 1988
SubjectProtection of the ozone layer

Background to the Convention

Negotiations on an international convention for the protection of the ozone layer began in 1981. The need for international action was clear as the anthropogenic causes of damage to the ozone layer were global in their affect. Agreement was reached in March 1985 in the form of the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone layer. The initial negotiations were driven by growing scientific concern at the depletion of the ozone layer which protects the earth from excessive ultraviolet radiation from the sun and also controls the temperature.

Although the cause had not been proven, it was thought that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons and other similar chemicals were to blame. When these gases are exposed to ultraviolet light they break down and free chlorine and bromine respectively which work to break down ozone molecules leading to depletion of the ozone layer.

In 1977 the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), called for comprehensive international research and monitoring of the ozone layer, the convention was eventually negotiated and concluded under the auspices of UNEP. The convention entered into force on 22

Popular documents