US arbitral institutions and their arbitration rules
Produced in partnership with Elizabeth A. Edmondson of Jenner & Block
US arbitral institutions and their arbitration rules

The following Arbitration guidance note Produced in partnership with Elizabeth A. Edmondson of Jenner & Block provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • US arbitral institutions and their arbitration rules
  • AAA, CPR, and JAMS—profiles
  • Rules relating to the selection and conduct of arbitrators
  • Rules governing conduct of the arbitration
  • Rules relating to awards
  • Availability of appeals
  • Costs of arbitration administrators

When arbitrating disputes seated in the United States of America (USA or US), domestic disputants can choose from a number of arbitral institutions to administer the proceedings. This Practice Note is intended to familiarise practitioners with the most commonly used arbitral institutions in the US: the American Arbitration Association (AAA); the International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (CPR); and JAMS. This Practice Note outlines the key differences between the institutions in terms of panel (tribunal) selection, applicable rules, and arbitration fees.

In this Practice Note, the following rules are referenced, except where otherwise noted:

  1. AAA Commercial Arbitration Rules and Mediation Procedures (2013) in force 1 October 2013 (AAA Rules; AAA))

  2. CPR Rules for Administered Arbitration (2019) in force 1 March 2019 (CPR Administered Rules; CPR)

  3. JAMS Comprehensive Arbitration Rules & Procedures (2014) in force 1 July 2014 (JAMS Rules; JAMS)

AAA, CPR, and JAMS—profiles

AAA

AAA, the oldest provider of ADR worldwide, was formed following the enactment of the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) in 1926. AAA provides administrative services for dispute resolution throughout the US, see: AAA arbitration—overview, and internationally through its International Centre for Dispute Resolution (ICDR), see: ICDR arbitration—overview. AAA maintains the world’s largest caseload of any arbitral institution, and on average, provides dispute resolution services in about 200,000 cases, the majority of which are purely domestic disputes.