Unlocking your emotional intelligence—how working better with others helps to put you ahead
Unlocking your emotional intelligence—how working better with others helps to put you ahead

The following In-house Advisor practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Unlocking your emotional intelligence—how working better with others helps to put you ahead
  • What is emotional intelligence?
  • Why does emotional intelligence matter?
  • Emotional intelligence and leadership
  • Law firms are from Mars, in-house teams are from Venus
  • Developing your own emotional intelligence
  • Building self-awareness
  • Developing social skills
  • Building emotional intelligence in your team
  • Useful extra resources

In September 2012, the Lexis In-house Advisory Board met to discuss the role of emotional intelligence in developing the effectiveness of the in-house legal team, facilitated by Kate Fleming of Huthwaite Legal. The following note is a summary of the discussion, together with some insights from leading sources. It considers the following themes: What is emotional intelligence? Why does emotional intelligence matter? Emotional intelligence and leadership, Law firms are from Mars in-house teams are from Venus, Developing your own emotional intelligence, and Building emotional intelligence in your team.

What is emotional intelligence?

Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to identify, assess and regulate the emotions of yourself, others and groups. Critical EI competencies include self-awareness, self-control, motivation, empathy and social skill (Goleman, 2000).

Why does emotional intelligence matter?

There is a growing body of evidence that those with higher levels of EI are more likely to succeed as leaders.

While qualities that are easier to evaluate (such as IQ) can determine early career success, you are more likely to be more successful as a leader if you are able to inspire and influence those around you. In a study of 181 competency models in 1998, Goleman found as many as '67% of the abilities deemed essential for effective performance for managers were emotional (interpersonal) competencies'.

In their 2004 article, The 6 Qs of Leadership, researchers Eichinger and Lombardo

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