United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)—snapshot
Produced in partnership with Nicola Canty, Barrister of 9 Hazel Tree Chambers
United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)—snapshot

The following Environment guidance note Produced in partnership with Nicola Canty, Barrister of 9 Hazel Tree Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)—snapshot
  • UNLCLOS I and UNCLOS III
  • Purpose of UNCLOS III
  • Key provisions
  • The Freedom of the High Seas
  • Key bodies
  • Related legislation in England and Wales

Title United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)
Parties 168
Adopted 10 December 1982
Entry into Force 16 November 1994
Full text United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
Subject [Catchwords] International Law of the Sea

UNLCLOS I and UNCLOS III

The International Law Commission (ILC) decided at its first meeting in 1949 to consider the codification and development of various aspects of the law of the sea. By 1956 the ILC had produced final draft articles with accompanying commentary that were circulated before the first Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS I), held over 9 weeks in Geneva in 1958.

UNCLOS I produced the four Geneva Conventions on 29 April 1958:

  1. Convention on the Territorial Sea and the Contiguous Zone

  2. Convention on the High Seas

  3. Convention on the Continental Shelf

  4. Convention on Fishing and Conservation of the Living Resources of the High Seas

The Second Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS