Q&As

Under sections 44–46 of the Audit Commission Act 1998 (now repealed), the Audit Commission had powers to require public bodies to publish information relating to their activities to enable comparisons between the performance standards of different bodies. Have these provisions been replaced with any equivalent powers or duties?

read titleRead full title
Produced in partnership with Kevin Long of Hackney Community Law Centre
Published on LexisPSL on 01/05/2018

The following Local Government Q&A produced in partnership with Kevin Long of Hackney Community Law Centre provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Under sections 44–46 of the Audit Commission Act 1998 (now repealed), the Audit Commission had powers to require public bodies to publish information relating to their activities to enable comparisons between the performance standards of different bodies. Have these provisions been replaced with any equivalent powers or duties?
  • Background to the legal framework for the audit of local public bodies
  • The new framework for the audit of local public bodies

Under sections 44–46 of the Audit Commission Act 1998 (now repealed), the Audit Commission had powers to require public bodies to publish information relating to their activities to enable comparisons between the performance standards of different bodies. Have these provisions been replaced with any equivalent powers or duties?

In answering this Q&A, we have focused on the new framework under the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014 (LAAA 2014). With the abolition of the Audit Commission, its functions in relation to non-local authority public bodies were largely transferred or subsumed by other bodies. For instance, the Audit Commission’s former powers in relation to the NHS were (in part) transferred to monitor under the Health and Social Care Act 2012. The Audit Commission’s former powers in relation to registered social landlords were largely transferred to the Regulator of Social Housing. These other regulators are outside the scope of this note.

The Audit Commission’s powers to require public bodies to publish information enabling their performance to be compared existed in England from 1992 until 2015. These powers have been exercised in Wales by the Auditor General for Wales (the Welsh Audit Office) since 2005 and continue to apply in Wales. A new local auditing framework in England was enacted under LAAA 2014. This framework relies on local auditors appointed by the National Audit Office (NAO) and Public Sector

Popular documents