UK Civil Nuclear Regulatory Bodies
Produced in partnership with Herbert Smith Freehills

The following Energy practice note produced in partnership with Herbert Smith Freehills provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • UK Civil Nuclear Regulatory Bodies
  • Brexit impact—Euratom and the UK Nuclear Sector
  • General Energy Regulation
  • Office of Gas and Electricity Markets
  • Environment Agency (England only)
  • Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) (Scotland only)
  • Natural Resources Wales (Wales only)
  • Health and Safety Executive (HSE)
  • Nuclear-Specific Regulation
  • Overview of the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR)
  • More...

UK Civil Nuclear Regulatory Bodies

Responsibilities for regulation of the UK civil nuclear industry are shared between several regulatory bodies, reflecting the distinction between the common duties owed by any generator of electricity and the additional duties arising from the unique attributes of nuclear energy generation. Nuclear-specific regulation was significantly consolidated in 2014 by the creation of the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR), replacing several bodies which had previously been responsible for regulating various different aspects of the nuclear industry. In addition, there are other government bodies which, while lacking general regulatory or supervisory powers, exercise specific facilitating and decision making functions and thereby have a significant role in the UK civil nuclear industry.

Brexit impact—Euratom and the UK Nuclear Sector

As of 31 January 2020 (exit day), the UK ceased to be an EU Member State. However, at this point in time, the UK entered a transition/implementation period during which it continued to be treated by the EU as a Member State for many purposes. The UK’s exit from the EU also meant the UK’s exit from the Euratom Community. 11pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marked the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s

Popular documents