Tomlin orders—court and court guide specific requirements
Tomlin orders—court and court guide specific requirements

The following Dispute Resolution practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Tomlin orders—court and court guide specific requirements
  • Varied court provisions for Tomlin orders
  • Commercial Court Tomlin orders
  • Chancery Division Tomlin orders
  • Drafting and lodging for approval
  • Tomlin orders—prescribed form of order
  • Tomlin orders relating to money claims—sealing by court associates in the Rolls Building, Chancery Division
  • Queen’s Bench Tomlin orders
  • Drafting and lodging for approval—QBD Guide
  • Use of Tomlin orders—QBD Guide
  • More...

Tomlin orders—court and court guide specific requirements

This Practice Note considers the different court (including court guide) specific requirements when drafting and filing Tomlin orders. For general guidance on Tomlin orders, see Practice Note: Tomlin orders.

For a sample Tomlin order see Precedent: Tomlin order.

For guidance on settling claims, see: Settlement and settling disputes—overview.

Varied court provisions for Tomlin orders

As highlighted in the decision in Zenith Logistics v Coury, there are different provisions amongst the different courts in relation to the sealing and/or approval of Tomlin orders. Zenith concerned matters proceeding in the Queen’s Bench Division and specifically avoided making provision for processes outside of it:

‘On the face of it, there does appear to be a difference between the practices of the Chancery Division and those of the Commercial Court, when it comes to the inspection of confidential agreements which the parties wish to implement via a consent order in Tomlin form. It would appear that the practice of the Commercial Court is to inspect confidential agreements to check that their terms would be enforceable, if it came to it. But I do not think it necessary or appropriate to explore the practice in other courts, or the reasons for any real or apparent differences in practice. I am dealing with two cases brought in the Queen’s Bench Division general list. I am doing so in the

Related documents:

Popular documents