Time management for family lawyers
Produced in partnership with Ursula Rice of Family First Solicitors
Time management for family lawyers

The following Family guidance note Produced in partnership with Ursula Rice of Family First Solicitors provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Time management for family lawyers
  • The human body-clock, concentration and productivity
  • Necessity of 'down time'
  • The nature of family law
  • Law firm hierarchy
  • Time management techniques that work

Time is one of the great commodities of the family lawyer. As a profession, the emphasis has only recently begun to shift from selling time, through to selling 'a great job' by the gradual introduction across the sector of fixed fees. Even so, the more 'great jobs' that can be achieved in a lawyer’s day, the more profitable the firm and the family lawyer. It seems everybody is under pressure to produce more in less time. How can family lawyers stay on top of their workload but stay happy with their work-life balance?

The human body-clock, concentration and productivity

There are only so many productive hours in a day and every family lawyer is allotted a freshly minted set of 24 hours on a rolling basis. Our bodies are governed by an internal circadian rhythm so all of us we have blocks of time in which we are more, or less, productive. Cognisance of the internal clock is helpful so that a family lawyer can plan their tasks and the day accordingly. Many find that the most productive hours of the day are early to mid-morning. Some know and dread the afternoon slump, approximately one hour after eating, when it is impossible to concentrate. Many people regain focus but at a lower level about two hours after food has been