The Judicial Pension Scheme 1993 (JUPRA)
Produced in partnership with Elizabeth Ovey of Radcliffe Chambers
The Judicial Pension Scheme 1993 (JUPRA)

The following Pensions guidance note Produced in partnership with Elizabeth Ovey of Radcliffe Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The Judicial Pension Scheme 1993 (JUPRA)
  • Statutory framework
  • Unregistered tax status
  • Governance
  • Eligibility
  • Transitional protection
  • Contributions
  • Retirement benefits
  • Lump sum death benefits
  • Survivor’s benefits
  • more

Statutory framework

The Judicial Pension Scheme includes a number of judicial pension schemes.

Historically, there were:

  1. the Judicial Pension Scheme 1981 (JPS 1981). Salaried judges appointed before 31 March 1995 usually belong to this unfunded final salary scheme, which was established under the Judicial Pensions Act 1981 (JPA 1981)

  2. the Judicial Pension Scheme 1993 (JPS 1993, alternatively known as JUPRA). Salaried judges appointed between 31 March 1995 and 31 March 2015 usually belong to this unfunded final salary scheme, which was established under the Judicial Pensions and Retirement Act 1993 (JPRA 1993). Note that there is a right of election to transfer from the JPS 1981 to the JPS 1993 at any time up to a date six months after retirement. For more information, see: Eligibility, below

By section 1 of the Public Service Pensions Act 2013 (PSPA 2013), Parliament made provision for new public service pension schemes to be established for many public sector employees, including the judiciary. For this purpose, the 'judiciary' is defined by the Public Service Pensions Act 2013 (Judicial Offices) Order 2015, SI 2015/580, to include any person who holds any of the offices specified in the Schedule to the Order.

As a result, the PSPA 2013 closed the JPS 1981 and JPS 1993 to further accrual from 1 April 2015, except where a judge was