The importance of being well: stress and work-life balance in-house—an interview with Claire Carless, General Counsel and Company Secretary at Siemens plc
The importance of being well: stress and work-life balance in-house—an interview with Claire Carless, General Counsel and Company Secretary at Siemens plc

The following In-house Advisor practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The importance of being well: stress and work-life balance in-house—an interview with Claire Carless, General Counsel and Company Secretary at Siemens plc
  • Tell us a little bit about your background and career to date
  • What sparked the conversation about well-being in your team?
  • How are the well-being initiatives reflected in company policies?
  • How important is it that you set an example to your team around work-life balance?
  • What part does company play in supporting well-being?
  • How can you sell the importance of such a safe environment to the business?
  • What results and changes have you seen in your team?
  • Is it hard to get people engaged in well-being initiatives?

The importance of being well: stress and work-life balance in-house—an interview with Claire Carless, General Counsel and Company Secretary at Siemens plc

Can you afford to ignore the impact of everyday work pressures on your team? We talked to Claire Carless, General Counsel and Company Secretary at Siemens plc, about what sparked her team’s conversation around well-being and the initiatives they have introduced to combat stress at work.

Tell us a little bit about your background and career to date

I started off in private practice with Stephenson Harwood in the early 1980s, first in London and then Hong Kong. I had been doing large corporate transactional work in London but in Hong Kong, the office was much smaller and so I turned my hand to a little bit of everything.

When I returned to the UK, I didn’t want to live in London so I started looking for a role outside the city. I found an in-house position which in those days was pretty unusual—it was generally something that people did when they weren't very successful in private practice. I took the role at National Power expecting to do corporate work again; however, it became clear that it was a broader role and I spent eight years getting great experience of working on big international projects.

In 2000, the company decided to demerge and split the business. I

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