The GMC interim orders tribunal
Produced in partnership with Andrew Hockton of Serjeants’ Inn Chambers
The GMC interim orders tribunal

The following Corporate Crime guidance note Produced in partnership with Andrew Hockton of Serjeants’ Inn Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The GMC interim orders tribunal
  • Interim orders tribunals
  • Referral to an interim orders tribunal
  • Powers of the interim orders tribunal
  • The test to apply before making an interim order
  • Procedure following referral to the interim orders tribunal

Interim orders tribunals

An interim orders tribunal (IOT), which was previously known as an Interim Orders Panel, is constituted under Schedule 1 of the Medical Act 1983 (MeA 1983), for the purposes of determining whether a practitioner's registration should be restricted while allegations about their fitness to practise are investigated.

An IOT does not make any finding of fact or determine the allegations against a practitioner.

Constitution of an interim orders tribunal

The composition of an interim orders panel is governed by the General Medical Council (Constitution of Panels, Tribunals and Investigation Committee) Rules Order of Council 2015, SI 2015/1965.

An interim orders panel consists of:

  1. a chair

  2. a medical panellist, and

  3. a lay panellist

The panellists are appointed by the GMC through open competition against agreed competencies.

There is no provision for the chair of IOT to be legally qualified. If the chair is not legally qualified, the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service (MPTS) must appoint a legal assessor to advise on questions of law.

More than one interim orders tribunal may be constituted by the GMC.

Referral to an interim orders tribunal

Under General Medical Council (Fitness to Practise) Rules Order of Council 2004, (GMC Fitness to Practise Rules 2004), SI 2004/2608 an allegation may be referred to an interim orders tribunal at any time by the Registrar of the GMC.

The GMC Registrar