The duty to produce a slavery and human trafficking statement
The duty to produce a slavery and human trafficking statement

The following Employment guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The duty to produce a slavery and human trafficking statement
  • Modern slavery
  • Transparency in supply chains—the duty to produce a slavery and human trafficking statement
  • Commencement of the duty
  • Which organisations have a duty to produce a slavery and human trafficking statement?
  • Drafting a slavery and human trafficking statement
  • Approving a statement
  • Publishing a statement
  • Failure to comply

Modern slavery is prevalent across the world. The ILO estimates that there are 21 million people in forced labour in the world today, while in the UK the government estimates that there are between 10 and 13 thousand potential victims of slavery. The government has responded to this national and global problem by enacting the Modern Slavery Act (MSA 2015). The MSA 2015 is designed to tackle forced labour and human trafficking in the UK on a number of levels. One of these is the new duty on businesses to be transparent about their practices and policies in relation to preventing slavery and human trafficking, both in their own organisations as well as in their global supply chains. The duty is set out in section 54 of MSA 2015. The Secretary of State has exercised his power under section 54(9) of MSA 2015 to issue guidance about the duties imposed by section 54, 'Transparency in supply chains etc. A practical guide' ('statutory guidance'). While no particular status has been ascribed to the statutory guidance, it is likely to be relevant (but not determinative) when it comes to interpreting the provisions of section 54.

Apart from a brief description of the offences of slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour, and human trafficking, which is relevant for the purposes of complying with section