The curriculum in maintained schools
Produced in partnership with Nicholas Hancox of Nicholas Hancox Solicitors Ltd and Hayley O'Sullivan of Browne Jacobson Solicitors
The curriculum in maintained schools

The following Local Government practice note produced in partnership with Nicholas Hancox of Nicholas Hancox Solicitors Ltd and Hayley O'Sullivan of Browne Jacobson Solicitors provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The curriculum in maintained schools
  • The Basic Curriculum in England
  • Collective worship
  • Religious education and religious instruction
  • Sex education
  • Political education
  • The National Curriculum in England
  • The National Curriculum in Wales
  • External qualifications and assessment in England and Wales

The curriculum in maintained schools

Coronavirus (COVID-19): This Practice Note contains guidance on subjects impacted by the Coronavirus Act 2020 (CA 2020). CA 2020, ss 37–38, Sch 16 Pt 1–Sch 16 Pt 3, Sch 17 Pt 1–Sch 17 Pt 3, among other measures, make provision to require temporary closure of educational institutions and to make temporary continuity directions relation to childcare, education and training by way of statutory instruments and/or guidance. For further information as to the current impact on this content, see: Coronavirus (COVID-19)—education tracker.

The Basic Curriculum in England

There are three elements in the Basic Curriculum in England:

  1. religious education

  2. sex education, and

  3. the National Curriculum

Collective worship

On each school day, but not necessarily at the start, pupils at maintained schools (including special schools) are to take part in collective worship, either all together or in different age or school groups, and on the school premises. On special occasions the governing body may, after consultation with the headteacher, arrange for it to take place elsewhere. The arrangements for collective worship are made differently depending on the type of school in question:

  1. at foundation schools with a religious character and at voluntary schools, the arrangements are to be made by the governing body after consultation with the headteacher

  2. at community schools and foundation schools without a religious character, by the headteacher after consulting the governing

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