The Central Arbitration Committee
Published by a LexisPSL Employment expert

The following Employment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The Central Arbitration Committee
  • Establishment and membership
  • Functions
  • Trade union recognition and derecognition
  • Voluntary arbitration
  • Unilateral arbitration
  • Complaints and applications relating to Information and Consultation
  • Complaints and applications in respect of European Works Councils
  • Complaints and applications in respect of European PLLCs

The Central Arbitration Committee

Coronavirus (COVID-19): This Practice Note is updated to take account of changes relating to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. See: Complaints and applications relating to Information and Consultation , below.

Establishment and membership

The Central Arbitration Committee is an independent arbitration body established by statute (section 259 of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 (TULR(C)A 1992)). Its staff and administrative resources are provided by Acas. It is based in London and although it has no regional offices, it operates nationally.

Members of the CAC are appointed by the Secretary of State, who is obliged to consult with Acas before appointing any member and may also consult with such other persons as he thinks appropriate. The Secretary of State must also appoint one member as Chairman and may appoint one or more members as Deputy Chairmen, in each case following consultation with Acas and with any other person he thinks appropriate.

Members of the CAC must have experience in industrial relations, and the CAC must include some members with experience of representing employers, and others with experience of representing workers.

Members of the CAC are appointed under terms of appointment. No member may be appointed for a single term of more than five years. However, a member may be re-appointed at the end of a term in office even if

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