The Basel Convention—snapshot
Produced in partnership with Howard McCann of Environment Agency

The following Environment practice note produced in partnership with Howard McCann of Environment Agency provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • The Basel Convention—snapshot
  • Background and purpose of the Basel Convention
  • Application, is it waste? And other definitions
  • General obligations
  • Prior informed consent
  • Illegal traffic, breach and consequentials
  • The Ban Amendment
  • Protocol on liability and compensation for damage
  • Plastic waste
  • OECD countries
  • More...

The Basel Convention—snapshot

TitleThe Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal
Entry into Force5 May 1992
AmendmentsThe Ban Amendment, Plastic Waste Amendment
Implementing legislationEU Waste Shipment Regulation 1013/2006
The Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations, SI 2007/1711
SubjectTransboundary Movements of Waste

Background and purpose of the Basel Convention

The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (the Convention) came into force on 5 May 1992, having been adopted on the 22 March 1989. The Convention arose out of global concern about the increase in exports of hazardous waste to developing countries during the 1970s and 1980s. It had become widely recognised that if these exports were not properly regulated their movement could pose a threat to human health and the environment. The United Nations Environment Programme listed the export of hazardous waste as one of three priority areas during its Programme on Environmental Law in Montevideo in 1981.As at June 2021, there were 188 Parties to the Convention. To become a party, a State must either formally ratify, accept, approve or accede to it. Such ratification, acceptance, approval or accession is effective once the formal state instrument ratifying (etc) the Convention is lodged with the Secretary-General of the UN in New York.

A full list of parties and ratifications can be found

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