Supply chain sustainability
Produced in partnership with Simon Garbett, Ian Skinner and Sarah Rathke of Squire Patton Boggs
Supply chain sustainability

The following Commercial guidance note Produced in partnership with Simon Garbett, Ian Skinner and Sarah Rathke of Squire Patton Boggs provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Supply chain sustainability
  • The UN Global Compact
  • Getting started—establishing a supplier code of conduct
  • Developing a supply chain sustainability programme addressing human rights and labour concerns
  • Developing a supply chain sustainability programme addressing environmental concerns
  • Developing a supply chain sustainability programme addressing corruption
  • Supply chain sustainability as litigation and risk mitigation
  • Working with NGOs to address supply chain concerns
  • Sustainable procurement—guidance: ISO 20400
  • Conclusion

The public increasingly hold organisations responsible for the impact of their suppliers' practices on the environment and local communities. Forward thinking and progressive businesses recognise there is a growing need for integrating environmentally sound and sustainable choices into supply chain management. Indeed, many organisations now routinely monitor and guide supplier conduct for ethical reasons, for reputation-management reasons, and to protect their brands. Supply chain sustainability has therefore gained considerable traction as an internationally recognised concept.

A sustainable supply chain provides value creation opportunities and offers significant competitive advantages for early adopters and process innovators. No longer are mere monetary cost, value and speed considerations the only drivers among purchasing and supply chain professionals. Responsible and progressive businesses are increasingly looking to put supply chain sustainability at the forefront of their organisational and cultural decision-making from the board level down—and see such steps as an essential tool to deliver long-term profitability.

The UN Global Compact

At a supra-national level, the UN Global Compact leads the effort to improve organisations' supply chain sustainability performance. The UN started this initiative in 2000 to promote its values within the global business community. Its directives are, however, non-binding and advisory only. Many businesses have nevertheless, signed up to the UN Global Compact as it is seen as ‘best practice’ for socially responsible corporates.

The UN Global Compact