Summary of key health and safety regulations for personal injury lawyers
Summary of key health and safety regulations for personal injury lawyers

The following PI & Clinical Negligence practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Summary of key health and safety regulations for personal injury lawyers
  • Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013
  • Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations 2009
  • Construction (Design and Management) Regulations
  • Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012
  • Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations
  • Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005
  • Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002
  • Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005
  • Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002
  • More...

This Practice Note sets out with a very brief summary the key health and safety regulations that currently apply in England and Wales. These regulations are relevant to claims arising pre 1 October 2013 in that they may give rise to civil liability; and for claims arising post 1 October 2013 a breach may give rise to negligence.

NOTE: The following health and safety regulations, which were made under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 to implement EU Directives, will continue in force as retained EU law after the Brexit transition/implementation period by virtue of section 2 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018.

Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013

On 1 October 2013, section 69 of the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013 (ERRA 2013) came into force. For workplace accidents occurring from that date, civil liability no longer arises from a breach of health and safety statutory duty unless the relevant regulation provides for it. Practitioners now have to prove the common law of negligence. While it will no longer be appropriate to base a claim on the breach of a regulation, claimant practitioners are able to still refer extensively to the relevant statutory provisions (or at least recite what they say) as setting out the standards of care expected. Indeed, in many cases the regulations can be referred to (in statements

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