Summary assessment—statement of costs (prior to April 2013) [Archived]

The following Dispute Resolution practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Summary assessment—statement of costs (prior to April 2013) [Archived]
  • What is a statement of costs?
  • Costs of producing the statement of costs
  • Solicitor recovery of costs from the client
  • Client recovery of costs for the other party
  • Filing the statement of costs
  • Missing the deadline for filing
  • Agreeing the amount of costs

Summary assessment—statement of costs (prior to April 2013) [Archived]

Archived: This Practice Note is based on provisions revoked on 1 April 2013. It is therefore for historical purposes only.

What is a statement of costs?

In order for the court to be in a position to assess the parties' costs, the party seeking an order for costs against another party must produce a 'statement of costs' in Form N260. This sets out all costs claimed in the application or the case.

The information you are required to provide in Form N260 is set out in practice direction 44 para 13.5(2).

Costs of producing the statement of costs

In some cases a lot of time may need to be spent in producing the statement of costs. Perhaps surprisingly there is no authority on whether these costs can be recovered.

Solicitor recovery of costs from the client

There is an argument that these costs should be irrecoverable. This is because the solicitor should prepare such a budget for its client in any event and the cost of producing the budget is not a cost of the claim but a matter between solicitor and client.

Conversely solicitors are obliged to provide these estimates under the SRA Code. As they are for the client's benefit it is arguable that these costs should be recoverable on a solicitor-client assessment, particularly where the letter of engagement expressly states

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