Step 5—embed the process—anticipating the response to major change
Produced in partnership with Beth Pipe of Bellis Learning Solutions Ltd
Step 5—embed the process—anticipating the response to major change

The following Practice Management guidance note Produced in partnership with Beth Pipe of Bellis Learning Solutions Ltd provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Step 5—embed the process—anticipating the response to major change
  • Managing change
  • The transition curve

There are five key steps to improving efficiency:

  1. identify the process that needs to be improved

  2. measure the problem

  3. analyse the information

  4. improve the process

  5. embed the new process so that it becomes common practice

Management consultants often refer to this is as the DMAIC framework.

This Practice Note provides additional guidance on Step 5 of the improving efficiency process, ie embedding the new process to overcome the problem you identified, have now measured, analysed and improved. People react in many different ways when faced with change, and this Practice Note considers the individual emotional impact of change and what you can do to engage and involve people in the change management and delivery process.

There is overlap between this guidance and Practice Note: Step 5—embed the process—making changes firm-wide, which explains Kotter's process for making change. The difference is that Kotter's viewpoint is procedural, whereas this Practice Note considers the individual emotional impact and response to change.

Managing change

Not all changes run smoothly and not all changes are for the better, but most are implemented with the best of intentions. When implementing change it is important to find a way to encourage everyone to contribute to the process in a constructive and positive manner. Address any issues and concerns raised by those affected by the change process and focus on the