SIAC—background to and structure of the institution
Produced in partnership with Mr Alvin Yeo, Senior Counsel, Chairman & Senior Partner of Wong Partnership LLP, Singapore

The following Arbitration practice note produced in partnership with Mr Alvin Yeo, Senior Counsel, Chairman & Senior Partner of Wong Partnership LLP, Singapore provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • SIAC—background to and structure of the institution
  • What is SIAC?
  • The SIAC Arbitration Rules
  • The SIAC Board of Directors
  • The SIAC Court of Arbitration
  • SIAC’s CEO and Secretariat
  • Facilities
  • Arbitrators
  • Mediation
  • The SIAC Arbitration Rules
  • More...

SIAC—background to and structure of the institution

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19): Many arbitral organisations have responded to the coronavirus pandemic with practical guidance and/or changes to their usual procedures and ways of working. For information on how this content and relevant arbitration proceedings may be impacted, see Practice Note: Arbitral organisations and coronavirus (COVID-19)—practical impact. For additional information, see: Coronavirus (COVID-19) and arbitration—overview.

This Practice Note provides an introduction to the Singapore International Arbitration Centre (SIAC) (or ‘the SIAC’). Additional guidance on SIAC arbitration proceedings can be found in the ‘Related documents’ pod.

What is SIAC?

The SIAC is an international arbitral institution established in 1991. SIAC is an independent, non-profit organisation that provides case management services for administering arbitrations both under its own arbitration rules and those of UNCITRAL. The institutions primary functions involve appointing arbitrators or a panel of arbitrators and managing the arbitral process on behalf of parties to an arbitration. SIAC provides a neutral, efficient and reliable service for resolution of disputes.

SIAC's popularity as an arbitral institution is underpinned by Singapore's policy of supporting international arbitration. The Singapore government has repeatedly emphasised its commitment to developing Singapore as an arbitration hub, and Singapore's courts have maintained a juridical philosophy that they are supportive of arbitration, with minimal curial intervention. Since its inception, SIAC has been growing in popularity as a centre for international dispute resolution. For

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