Sexual risk orders
Produced in partnership with Monica Stevenson of 25 Bedford Row

The following Corporate Crime practice note produced in partnership with Monica Stevenson of 25 Bedford Row provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Sexual risk orders
  • Key features
  • What are SROs?
  • When can an SRO be made?
  • Duration of a SRO
  • Effect on the notification requirements under the SOA 2003
  • Grounds for making an order
  • Procedure
  • Variation, renewal and discharge on an order
  • Interim orders
  • More...

Sexual risk orders

The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (ABCPA 2014) amended Parts 2 and 3 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (SOA 2003) so as to insert new sections 122A–122K which provide for sexual risk orders (SROs). An SRO is a civil order which aims to protect the general public in the UK or children or vulnerable adults overseas from individuals who pose a risk of harm. SROs enable the courts to impose any restrictions which are deemed necessary to prevent such individuals from causing harm to the general public in the UK or children or vulnerable adults overseas.

The main difference between an SRO and a sexual harm prevention order is that an SRO can be imposed on a person who has not been convicted of or cautioned for an offence listed in Schedules 3 or 5 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003. For information on sexual harm prevention orders, see Practice Note: Sexual harm prevention orders.

SROs replace the old regime of risk of sexual harm orders and foreign travel orders in England and Wales. The old regime was repealed from 8 March 2015. For information on risk of sexual harm orders and foreign travel orders, see Practice Notes: Risk of sexual harm orders [Archived] and Foreign travel orders [Archived].

Key features

What are SROs?

An SRO is a civil order which can be sought

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